Are FMRI Data Analysis Methods Reliable?

There’s been a lot of discussion on social media of a recent paper in PNAS by Anders Eklund, Tom Nichols, and Hans Knutsson.
Cluster failure: Why fMRI inferences for spatial extent have inflated false-positive rates
Even Science magazine felt they needed to address it. What is this fuss all about?

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Posted in by Mark Reimers, Technologies, Uncategorized
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RayAkyroyd

Ectoplasm–Ghostbusters to spooky twitching nerves

“He slimed me!”  Venkman spits out in disgust, writhing in sticky ectoplasm in a memorable scene from the 1984 movie Ghostbusters.

Ectoplasm, the mysterious stuff of the supernatural world, also makes nerve axons twitch every time they fire, but almost nobody talks about it.

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Posted in by Douglas Fields, Cell Communication
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198 million-year-old trackway of fossil footprints of the theropod dinosaur Eubrontes from the Jurassic Period at the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm.

Tracking Dinosaur Intelligence: What Fossil Footprints Reveal about the Dinosaur’s Brain

             Displaying the sleuthing skills of Sherlock Holmes, Jerry Harris carefully tracks the footprints to a point where they disintegrate into a muddle of scratches.  He vividly deduces what transpired here. “Came up out of Lake Dixie,” Harris says, pointing to prints leading up the slope.   “Sat down on the side of the berm . . . sat down in such a way that it rested both its hands and feet.” Continue reading

Posted in Animal Research, by Douglas Fields, Evolution, Movement, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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256px-Putamen

What are Computational and Systems Neuroscience?

One of the fundamental questions motivating neuroscientists is to understand the relationship between brain activity and lived experience: how the different parts of the brain work together to produce the key ingredients for behavior: memory, feeling, thinking and imagination. These motivating issues have been pretty much inaccessible for most of the history of neuroscience, because we could not observe very much of the brain in action in enough detail to identify individual circuits or on the time scale on which they work. That is starting to change.

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Posted in by Mark Reimers, Technologies
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