Ebola on the Brain

On September 23, 1976, while the nation’s attention was focused on the battle between Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter for President of the United States, a 42-year-old woman half way around the world was engaged in a personal battle. Outside the limelight of world view, her struggle for life in a remote third world country marked the crossing of a threshold for our species. Continue reading

Posted in Animal Research, Brain Basics, by Douglas Fields, Caregivers, Diseases & Disorders, In Society, Uncategorized
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3D Printed Brain Saves A Life

We are constantly hearing about 3D printing in the media. Whether people are making 3D-printed cars, guns, or even organs, this technology is becoming wild with the thousands of different applications. My new favorite: a 3D printed brain. Continue reading

Posted in Brain Basics, by Steven Miller, Diseases & Disorders, Epilepsy, Neuroanatomy, Technologies
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NEURO.tv Episode 12 – Optogenetics and anxiety-related behaviors, with Kay Tye.

What is optogenetics and how is it used to determine the contribution of brain areas to normal and dysfunctional behaviors? We discuss with Kay Tye, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at MIT. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Across the Lifespan, Authors, Brain Basics, by Steven Miller, Cell Communication, Mood, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Stress and Anxiety, Technologies
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Sharks use ESP

As the water warms in summer, beachgoers flock to the ocean and thoughts of “jaws” inevitably surface. A shark’s ability to home in on the scent of blood is legendary, but many people are surprised to learn that sharks have a stealthy sixth sense to find prey and explore the world around them. Sharks have the ability to sense an electric aura that surrounds all creatures in seawater–including people. Continue reading

Posted in Animal Research, by Douglas Fields, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Stress and Anxiety
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Scientists on Twitter.

Neil Hall from the University of Liverpool has published a very interesting mini-study on scientists and Twitter. He developed a metric that compares the popularity of scientists on Twitter to the impact of their publications within peer-reviewed journals. The metric is called the Kardashian Index, a reference to the fact that Kim Kardashian became wildly popular for no apparent reason, and a wink at those scientists who get Twitter popularity without having accomplished as much as others in their scientific career. Neil Hall is not necessarily critiquing the individuals who use Twitter to their advantage – he simply creates a metric that finds discrepancies between Twitter popularity and scientific popularity. The idea is brilliant, but in my view the short article is based on an incorrect premise. The premise is that science and social media contributions are two fundamentally separate things that can be compared to each other. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Authors, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Educators, In Society, Neuroeducation, Press, Technologies
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The rhythm of lobster season

Today is the second and last day of “mini-season” here in South Florida. That is, the last Wednesday and Thursday of July where Florida lobsters are available for the taking by non-commercial lobster hunters. I grew up in New England and I love me some huge (i.e. 2-3 lb) Maine lobsters, but since establishing some roots down here in sunny Florida, I’ve grown to like the smaller, but still sweet tasting cockroaches of the sea. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Animal Research, by Leanne Boucher, Cell Communication, Chemicals, Diet and Exercise, Diseases & Disorders, Movement, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Technologies
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