The gauntlet has been thrown

On the second day of classes, I polled my students to find out how many had taken the #ALSIceBucketChallenge. About half of them raised their hands; the other half looking on either smugly (they hadn’t done it…yet) or embarrassed (they had done it, but they didn’t want to admit it).

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Posted in Aging, by Leanne Boucher, Caregivers, Cell Communication, Degenerative Disorders, Movement, Movement Disorders, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy
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Sharks use ESP

As the water warms in summer, beachgoers flock to the ocean and thoughts of “jaws” inevitably surface. A shark’s ability to home in on the scent of blood is legendary, but many people are surprised to learn that sharks have a stealthy sixth sense to find prey and explore the world around them. Sharks have the ability to sense an electric aura that surrounds all creatures in seawater–including people. Continue reading

Posted in Animal Research, by Douglas Fields, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Stress and Anxiety
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The rhythm of lobster season

Today is the second and last day of “mini-season” here in South Florida. That is, the last Wednesday and Thursday of July where Florida lobsters are available for the taking by non-commercial lobster hunters. I grew up in New England and I love me some huge (i.e. 2-3 lb) Maine lobsters, but since establishing some roots down here in sunny Florida, I’ve grown to like the smaller, but still sweet tasting cockroaches of the sea. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Animal Research, by Leanne Boucher, Cell Communication, Chemicals, Diet and Exercise, Diseases & Disorders, Movement, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Technologies
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Why Girls Like Guys Who Kayak

            She’s checking out your on-line profile. 

            “I am a scientist who enjoys bird watching and canoeing.” 

            “Interesting!” she thinks. 

            Then she scrolls to the next profile; also a scientist:

            “I enjoy white water kayaking, and I study alligators in the wild.” 

            She passes on you with your canoe, and in eager anticipation sends the kayaker an electronic “wink.” 

            This, according to a study by psychologist John Petraitis, is what most women will do, but why?

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Posted in Addiction, Aging, by Douglas Fields, Childhood, Evolution, Psychiatric Disorders, Uncategorized
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Aging and the Changing Landscape of Memory

An interesting interview has been published recently by Bruce Liberman with three leaders in research on memory and aging. Very interesting perspectives, see details below or read it here! Continue reading

Posted in Across the Lifespan, Aging, Authors, Brain Basics, Brain Development, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Diseases & Disorders, Learning and Memory, Psychiatric Disorders, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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