A Manhattan Project to Map the Brain?

When anyone wants to support science, I’m in. These are trying times, when the scientific enterprise is facing severe cuts as budget sequestration looms, creating even more uncertainty and angst among research institutions – not to mention young scientists who might be questioning whether they want to enter a career with such a high level of risk. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Addiction, by Dwayne Godwin, Cancer, Childhood Disorders, Degenerative Disorders, Diseases & Disorders, Educators, Epilepsy, Policymakers, Press, Technologies
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Not about the bike, after all

We are suckers for Horatio Alger stories. We love it when the underdog defies the odds, pulls out the last minute jumper, or makes the save. It’s a surrogate for those times when we do the same thing. We know — on a lesser scale — what it’s like to be behind and losing, and to sometimes squeak one out when nobody expected it. Even when we can’t, we appreciate it when others do it. That’s one reason why the Lance Armstrong revelations hurt. They ram a stake in the heart of our childlike sense of what’s possible. Even with growing doubts, up until he confessed I wanted to believe Lance — didn’t you? Continue reading

Posted in Brain Basics, by Dwayne Godwin, Educators, Evolution, In Society, Neuroethics, Psychiatric Disorders, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Stress and Anxiety, Uncategorized
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Big Head, Dark Heart: The Notorious Brain of Edward H. Rulloff

Sometimes bigger really is better – but does the size of the brain, or brain bumps, mean what we think? When it comes to complex brain functions, it’s good to remember the old saying: “the map is not the territory”.

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Posted in by Dwayne Godwin, Educators, Neuroeducation, Neuroethics, Neurolaw, Press
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