Wipe Out Fearful Memories

I’ll never forget it.  They strapped electrodes to my wrist, cranked up a black dial on a frightening electronic device encrusted with switches and knobs, and shocked me repeatedly with jolts of electricity.  Continue reading

Posted in by Douglas Fields, Learning and Memory, Mood, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Psychiatric Disorders, Stress and Anxiety, Uncategorized
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment

Creativity, Madness and Drugs

San Diego–Would we have Poe’s Raven today if the tormented author had taken lithium to suppress his bipolar illness? Not likely, considering the high frequency of psychiatric illnesses among writers and artists concludes psychiatrist Kay Jamison of Johns Hopkins Medical School speaking this week at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in San Diego. Madness electrifies the creative process Jamison concludes, but this difficult drug-use dilemma raises an even more provocative question: Would we have Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds had the Beatles not taken LSD?

Continue reading

Posted in Addiction, Animal Research, Brain Development, by Douglas Fields, Chemicals, Mood, Neural Network Function, Neuroethics, Psychiatric Disorders, Stress and Anxiety, Uncategorized
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment

NEURO.tv Episode 5 – Grid cells and navigation

In this episode, we talk about grid cells and place cells. These fascinating neurons process information that relate to where an animal is located in space. They are believed to play important roles in navigating the environment. Our guests are May-Britt and Edvard Moser from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Awareness and Attention, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, by John Kubie, by Leanne Boucher, Movement, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
Posted by Jean-François Gariépy        Comment

Why Girls Are More Vulnerable to Maltreatment

Women suffer depression and anxiety disorders at higher rates than men; a new study finds an interesting new explanation for this.  Unwholesome family life can alter development of threat-detection circuits in the brain of young girls, which persist into adulthood and predispose women to developing mood and anxiety disorders as adolescents and young adults.  Boys are also negatively impacted by family stresses during childhood, but the lasting effects on their brain were seen in only one of two neural circuits controlling our response to threats, anxiety and fear.

Continue reading

Posted in Addiction, Brain Development, by Douglas Fields, Caregivers, Childhood, Childhood Disorders, Educators, Mood, Neural Network Function, Neuroeducation, Pregnancy and Parenting, Psychiatric Disorders, Stress and Anxiety, Uncategorized
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment

To Kill a Crying Baby

Squeezing her hand over the toddler’s nose and mouth she smothered him to death because he would not stop crying.  Last Monday 22-year-old Jessica Fraraccio pleaded guilty in court to felony murder of 23-month-old Elijah Nealey in the summer of 2012.  No one in their right mind could conceive of committing such a horrible act, but babies are tragically killed or left severely brain damaged by shaken baby syndrome inflicted by a parent, family member, or caretaker frustrated by a child’s incessant crying. Dismissing those with depraved minds, how can we comprehend such sad stories as this one in the Washington Post?

Continue reading

Posted in by Douglas Fields, Caregivers, Childhood, Childhood Disorders, Educators, Mood, Neural Network Function, Pregnancy and Parenting, Psychiatric Disorders, Stress and Anxiety, Uncategorized
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment

From Mind to Movement.

Ted Chiang, one of science fiction’s preeminent writers, once imagined an interesting fictional device in his short story, “What’s expected of us”. Without fail, a device called a Predictor flashes a light one second before the user presses the button. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Movement, Neural Network Function, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
Posted by Jean-François Gariépy        Comment
The Detroit River

David H. Hubel’s great gift to neuroscience.

David H. Hubel, whose work unveiled fascinating brain processes that underlie our sense of vision, died last month at the age of 87.

Hubel’s parents were Americans, living in Detroit, Michigan. His father had a job in Windsor, Ontario. Tired of commuting across the Detroit River, he moved to Canada, where David Hubel was born. During his childhood David spent considerable effort learning to play the piano, and later the flute. In 1929, the family moved to Montreal where David Hubel grew up. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Awareness and Attention, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
Posted by Jean-François Gariépy        Comment