No Fear

In an interesting article in the magazine Nautilus, J.B. MacKinnon, reports that a brain scan (fMRI) of free solo climber, Alex Honnold’s brain explains why he is so willing to risk his life to climb rocks without a rope.  The fear circuitry in his brain is dysfunctional.

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Posted in Awareness and Attention, by Douglas Fields, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Neuroethics, Psychiatric Disorders, Senses and Perception, Stress and Anxiety
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The Neuroscience of Violence

We are on the brink of a new understanding of the neuroscience of violence. Like detectives slipping a fiber optic camera under a door, neuroscientists insert a fiber optic microcamera into the brain of an experimental animal and watch the neural circuits of rage respond during violent behavior. Continue reading

Posted in Addiction, Aging, by Douglas Fields, Childhood, In Society, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Psychiatric Disorders, Stress and Anxiety
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The Taste of Thanksgiving

I took a sip of sugary Coke and was struck by a hideous intense blast of aluminum.  I rushed to the sink and spit out the tainted drink.  Poison!  What’s wrong with this Coke!  I took another tentative sip.  I was slammed again by the overwhelming metallic taste.  I spat out the poison by rapid reflex.  This can of Coke must have been contaminated during manufacturing!  Or, had the likes of the Tylenol Killer switched to soft drinks?  Then I remembered. . .  the taste of Thanksgiving and mountain climbing!

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Posted in Aging, Brain Development, by Douglas Fields, Chemicals, Diet and Exercise, Diseases & Disorders, Mood, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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“You Don’t Have Time to Think.” Heroic Veteran Capt. Florent Groberg’s Selfless Action

 

Today it was announced that Army Capt. Florent Groberg will receive the Medal of Honor for instantly tackling a suicide bomber in a split-second reaction of self-sacrifice to save the lives of his comrades.  “You don’t have time to think.  You react,” he explains.  But how is that possible?

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Posted in Awareness and Attention, by Douglas Fields, In Society, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Stress and Anxiety, Uncategorized
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