The Pregnant Homunculus

One of the hazards associated with being a neuroscientist is that propecia you see the world through neural-colored glasses: everything relates back to brain functioning in some way or another. I suppose this can probably be said about clomid online any number of professions, and I may be biased, but I think neuro-geeks (myself included) have a particularly interesting view of the world. Let me give you an example. Continue reading

Posted in by Leanne Boucher, Neuroanatomy, Pregnancy and Parenting, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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Ctenophore

Did the nervous system evolve twice?

There is a news article in Science about a talk made at the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology by Leonid Moroz in which he reports results concerning the genome of a Ctenophore, commonly called comb jelly1. Here is one of those beasts. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Evolution, Genetics, Neuroanatomy
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Deep areas of the brain.

Where is fear?

Is the feeling of fear instantiated in some brain area or is fear just a word we use to describe a series events distributed across the brain which make us avoid things that are bad? Do other animal experience the same subjective state that we experience when we are afraid? Those are some of the questions that are asked in a recent review paper published by Ralph Adolphs in Current Biology. Continue reading

Posted in Across the Lifespan, Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Diseases & Disorders, Evolution, Mood, Neuroanatomy, Psychiatric Disorders, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Stress and Anxiety
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Anterior Cingulate Cortex

What is intelligence ?

What do we mean when we say someone is intelligent and is there any scientific basis for defining intelligence? These questions have been at the center of a more than century-old debate in psychology. Intelligence is, first and foremost, a judgment. He’s intelligent, he’s not intelligent, those are quick ways of saying that some behaviors of an individual observed in the past somehow predict how brilliant his next actions will be. Intelligence is an estimate of the quality that we attribute to the decision-making and abstract thinking of people around us. Although it may be practical for people to think of intelligence as something that exists, whether science should consider intelligence and how it would define it remains very controversial. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Language, Learning and Memory, Neuroanatomy, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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Just Itching to Know

What is an itch?  That insistent tickle demanding that you cease whatever you are doing and claw with your fingernails at a particular spot on your skin.  It can come from anywhere—the top of your head to the soles of your feet–inside your ear to your eyeballs.  NOTHING will satisfy an itch except scratching it.  Continue reading

Posted in by Douglas Fields, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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Prefrontal brain areas track subjective confidence.

People act and decide with varying confidence levels.

As they explore novel environments, people try options before fully committing to them; testing if that wooden bridge is solid enough, inspecting the tires of a car or trying a limited version of a product before buying it. Tracking and improving the confidence that we have on what surrounds us allows us to explore and exploit features of the environment successfully. Confidence is likely a major determinant of the economical decisions that we make, but the brain mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Awareness and Attention, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Learning and Memory, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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