No Fear

In an interesting article in the magazine Nautilus, J.B. MacKinnon, reports that a brain scan (fMRI) of free solo climber, Alex Honnold’s brain explains why he is so willing to risk his life to climb rocks without a rope.  The fear circuitry in his brain is dysfunctional.

Continue reading

Posted in Awareness and Attention, by Douglas Fields, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Neuroethics, Psychiatric Disorders, Senses and Perception, Stress and Anxiety
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment

Ectoplasm–Ghostbusters to spooky twitching nerves

“He slimed me!”  Venkman spits out in disgust, writhing in sticky ectoplasm in a memorable scene from the 1984 movie Ghostbusters.

Ectoplasm, the mysterious stuff of the supernatural world, also makes nerve axons twitch every time they fire, but almost nobody talks about it.

Continue reading

Posted in by Douglas Fields, Cell Communication
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment

Tracking Dinosaur Intelligence: What Fossil Footprints Reveal about the Dinosaur’s Brain

             Displaying the sleuthing skills of Sherlock Holmes, Jerry Harris carefully tracks the footprints to a point where they disintegrate into a muddle of scratches.  He vividly deduces what transpired here. “Came up out of Lake Dixie,” Harris says, pointing to prints leading up the slope.   “Sat down on the side of the berm . . . sat down in such a way that it rested both its hands and feet.” Continue reading

Posted in Animal Research, by Douglas Fields, Evolution, Movement, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment