The Absurdity of “Medical Marijuana”

Marijuana use is legal in many states for medical purposes, most of them dealing with neurological conditions (pain, epilepsy, tremor, multiple sclerosis, and many others).  From the perspective of a neuroscientist researcher, the situation with respect to “medical marijuana” is absurd.  Continue reading

Posted in Addiction, Animal Research, Brain Development, by Douglas Fields, Cell Communication, Chemicals, Degenerative Disorders, Diseases & Disorders, Epilepsy, Immune System Disorders, Movement Disorders, Neural Network Function, Neuroethics, Neurolaw, Policymakers, Psychiatric Disorders, Technologies, Uncategorized
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In Science, Slow and Steady Wins the Race


Multiple sclerosis
(MS) is a devastating neurological disease where the protective layer around nerves begins to die off, attacked by the body’s own immune system. Without this insulation, the nervous system begins to shut down. Eventually, many people with MS lose the ability to move, speak and control basic bodily functions. Patients usually get their diagnosis in the prime of life and there is nothing to be done besides taking drugs that will postpone the progression of symptoms. These treatments are associated with side effects that can be as debilitating as the disease itself and they are hugely expensive. So, in 2006 when an Italian physician, Dr Paolo Zamboni, announced a simple method for treating MS, it received international attention. Continue reading

Posted in by Emily Jordan, Degenerative Disorders, Immune System Disorders, Movement Disorders, Neuroethics
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PET imaging

Brainy stuff of the month.

I thought I would share some of the interesting stuff I read this month on the web. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Degenerative Disorders, Diseases & Disorders, Evolution, Immune System Disorders, In Society, Language, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Press, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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