Memory and Aging, a live webcast with Eric Kandel, Elias Pavlopoulos and Scott Small

There will be an interesting webcast on memory and aging on Nov. 6, at 12:30-1 pm PST time. Don’t miss it! Continue reading

Posted in Across the Lifespan, Aging, Authors, Brain Basics, Brain Development, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Degenerative Disorders, Diseases & Disorders, Learning and Memory, Psychiatric Disorders, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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To Kill a Crying Baby

Squeezing her hand over the toddler’s nose and mouth she smothered him to death because he would not stop crying.  Last Monday 22-year-old Jessica Fraraccio pleaded guilty in court to felony murder of 23-month-old Elijah Nealey in the summer of 2012.  No one in their right mind could conceive of committing such a horrible act, but babies are tragically killed or left severely brain damaged by shaken baby syndrome inflicted by a parent, family member, or caretaker frustrated by a child’s incessant crying. Dismissing those with depraved minds, how can we comprehend such sad stories as this one in the Washington Post?

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Posted in by Douglas Fields, Caregivers, Childhood, Childhood Disorders, Educators, Mood, Neural Network Function, Pregnancy and Parenting, Psychiatric Disorders, Stress and Anxiety, Uncategorized
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Photo by DAVID ILIFF. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0

Don’t Fail the Future: Science as a National Choice

As the government shutdown nears the two week mark, it’s worth examining the effect of this latest political showdown on American science, and what this says about our collective values. This value conversation is relevant on the heels of Nobel prize winning scientists being placed on furlough while the congressional gym remains open. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Aging, Brain Basics, by Dwayne Godwin, Cancer, Degenerative Disorders, Diseases & Disorders, In Society, Policymakers, Press, Technologies
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Neural Circuits of Fair Play Discovered in the Human Brain

“Listen to your conscience,” my mother would say.But where does that mysterious urge to do what is right come from? Scientists have now pinpointed the brain circuitry that compels us to behave according to social norms; moreover, researchers can boost a person’s fairness by exciting this brain region, and promote cheating by inhibiting this bit of brain tissue.

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Posted in by Douglas Fields, Childhood Disorders, Educators, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Neuroeducation, Neuroethics, Policymakers, Uncategorized
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Design a Brain Experiment Competition Is Back!

Now in it’s the third year, the Dana Foundation is once again calling on the future neuroscientists of America to submit their most creative brain experiment ideas to the “Design a Brain Experiment Competition.” Last year the number of submissions tripled and we received some great experiment ideas, topped off by the winning submission, “The Use of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Schizophrenia,” from Charltien Long of the Head-Royce School in Oakland, California. Continue reading

Posted in by the Dana Foundation, Educators, In Society, Injury, Uncategorized
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NEURO.tv Episode 2

On this episode we have Leanne Boucher from Nova Southeastern University and Nick Spitzer from UCSD. We discuss with Nick about his new discoveries recently published in Science. His article shows how certain neurons switch their neurotransmitters based on exposition of an animal to different schedules of light/dark cycles. You can view the full discussion here, it was fascinating! Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Across the Lifespan, Animal Research, Authors, Awareness and Attention, Brain Basics, Brain Development, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, by Leanne Boucher, Cell Communication, Chemicals, Diseases & Disorders, Evolution, Mood, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Stress and Anxiety
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