No Fear

In an interesting article in the magazine Nautilus, J.B. MacKinnon, reports that a brain scan (fMRI) of free solo climber, Alex Honnold’s brain explains why he is so willing to risk his life to climb rocks without a rope.  The fear circuitry in his brain is dysfunctional.

Continue reading

Posted in Awareness and Attention, by Douglas Fields, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Neuroethics, Psychiatric Disorders, Senses and Perception, Stress and Anxiety
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gun_violence.jpg

The Neuroscience of Violence

We are on the brink of a new understanding of the neuroscience of violence. Like detectives slipping a fiber optic camera under a door, neuroscientists insert a fiber optic microcamera into the brain of an experimental animal and watch the neural circuits of rage respond during violent behavior. Continue reading

Posted in Addiction, Aging, by Douglas Fields, Childhood, In Society, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Psychiatric Disorders, Stress and Anxiety
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment

Zika: Ten things to know about a new public health emergency

The Zika virus is a global health threat. Despite renewed urgency because of the evidence suggesting that Zika causes birth defects, science has known of the virus for some time. It’s a deadly and debilitating virus for some newborns, so it’s important to have an accurate picture of the science behind it, the risks of infection and how it affects developing brains. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Animal Research, Awareness and Attention, Brain Development, by Dwayne Godwin, Childhood, Childhood Disorders, Neuroethics, Policymakers, Pregnancy and Parenting, Press
Posted by Dwayne Godwin        Comment

To Learn by Example

A neuroscience demonstration.

At the east end of the University of Arizona’s 7.5 acre grass mall is a Carolina sphinx moth fit snug in a blue plastic tube with its insect head sticking out. Two electrodes, one placed on the left eye and the other in a tiny clear plastic tube surrounding the moth’s right antenna. The electrodes are hooked up to a portable screen that displays the measured electrical activity of the moth’s antenna. Each antenna houses a quarter million primary sensory neurons that allow the moth to sense its environment. In this case, the environment happens to be engulfed in the smoky smell of barbecued ribs coming from the BrushFire’s BBQ co. tent next door. Continue reading

Posted in by Dara Farhadi, Educators, Neuroeducation
Posted by Dara Farhadi        Comment

Marijuana Use Causes 7-Fold Increased Risk of Violent Behavior

Marijuana use and violence

New research reported in the journal Psychological Medicine, concludes that continued use of cannabis causes violent behavior as a direct result of changes in brain function that are caused by smoking marijuana over many years. Continue reading

Posted in Addiction, Brain Development, by Douglas Fields, Chemicals, Educators, In Society, Neural Network Function, Policymakers, Psychiatric Disorders, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Uncategorized
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment

Meldonium, Tennis Star Maria Sharapova’s Performance-enhancing Drug Explained

Tennis star Maria Sharapova has admitted to using the performance-enhancing drug meldonium, which boosts brain and body power and endurance. Here’s how it works.

Continue reading

Posted in by Douglas Fields, Chemicals, Diet and Exercise, Diseases & Disorders, In Society, Injury, Learning and Memory, Neuroethics, Stress and Anxiety, Uncategorized
Posted by Douglas Fields        Comment