Memory and Aging, a live webcast with Eric Kandel, Elias Pavlopoulos and Scott Small

There will be an interesting webcast on memory and aging on Nov. 6, at 12:30-1 pm PST time. Don’t miss it! Continue reading

Posted in Across the Lifespan, Aging, Authors, Brain Basics, Brain Development, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Degenerative Disorders, Diseases & Disorders, Learning and Memory, Psychiatric Disorders, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
Posted by Jean-François Gariépy        Comment

Place Cells, Remapping and Memory

Bob Muller, close friend and collaborator, died two weeks ago. I met Bob in the early 1980s. I was a post-doc, learning to record from single neurons in Jim Ranck’s lab at Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn. Bob was a young faculty member who worked down the hall. Although Bob was doing esoteric work, studying the physics of single channels in membranes, his early graduate work had been in brain-behavior relations and he wanted to return to the study of behavior. Continue reading

Posted in by John Kubie, Learning and Memory, Neural Network Function
Posted by John Kubie        Comment

Discussion Tuesday, Sept. 17th on how babies learn sounds first encountered in the womb!

This discussion should be very interesting, don’t miss it! The hangout will be at Noon-12:30 pm (Pacific Time) on Tuesday September 17. Continue reading

Posted in Across the Lifespan, Authors, Brain Basics, Brain Development, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Childhood, Language, Learning and Memory, Pregnancy and Parenting, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
Posted by Jean-François Gariépy        Comment

Brains are made of plastic

Brains are made of plastic. Seems like a ridiculous claim. The brain is not made of plastic. Or, is it? In neuroscience we often refer to the brain as being plastic, but, what is plastic? The definition that most of us are familiar with is the material known as plastic. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Brain Basics, by Steven Miller, Cell Communication, Learning and Memory, Neural Network Function
Posted by Steven Miller        Comment

Memento and Personal Identity

I’ve been reflecting on issues of Personal Identity; last month I wrote a blog post on this. On Saturday evening I rented Memento (2000) and watched for the second and third times. This remarkable film features adventure, mystery, human drama, and fascinating movie technique. Over-riding all of these is the portrayal of memory and the mind. Although I’ve been studying memory for 30 years, Memento gave fresh perspectives. If the role of art is to present fresh insights by sharing the thoughts of others, Momento is true and impressive art.

Continue reading

Posted in by John Kubie, Learning and Memory
Posted by John Kubie        2 Comments

Human Grid Cells

Grid Cells in rat entorhinal cortex were discovered in the Moser lab in Trondheim, Norway. These cells were first described in a paper in Nature 20051; For the past  8 years these neurons have been objects of intense study. As the New York Times reports, a paper published yesterday in Nature Neuroscience2 indicates rats aren’t the only animals with grid cells; people have them, too. What are grid cells and what is the significance of recording them in humans?

Continue reading

Posted in Animal Research, by John Kubie, Learning and Memory, Neural Network Function
Posted by John Kubie        1 Comment