Book Review: Consciousness and the Brain

Every ten years the scientific study of consciousness passes a milestone. A decade ago the milestone was the publication of Chrisof Koch’s book “Quest for Consciousness” (2004). “Quest” established the groundwork for a scientific approach to the study of consciousness and described progress using techniques of neuroscience and experimental psychology1. Stenislas Dehaene’s book “Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering how the Brain Codes our Thoughts” presents a mass of new data and along with new theory. I believe it is a major consolidation; a milestone marking the trail forward for the next decade. Continue reading

Posted in Awareness and Attention, by John Kubie, Senses and Perception
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NEURO.tv Episode 10 – Parkinson’s disease and the basal ganglia.

What are the brain changes that cause Parkinson’s disease? In this special episode, Steven Miller traveled to Japan to discuss the current research on this subject with Professor Gordon Arbuthnott from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Brain Basics, Brain Development, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, by Steven Miller, Degenerative Disorders, Diseases & Disorders, Movement, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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Everything is Awesome!

Where Do Brains Come From? Part II: Everything is Awesome!

Stories about evolution are compelling because they fit with our very human need for a linear narrative, but evolution possesses distinctive non-linearities driven by its agent, natural selection. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Brain Basics, by Dwayne Godwin, Evolution, Genetics, Neuroanatomy, Policymakers, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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Butterflies’ Mate Choices Are Influenced by Early Social Interactions

In nature, we find many examples of animals that favor mates with a certain set of features. In some cases, such sexual selection leads to impressive changes to the morphology of animals through the course of evolution, such as the enormous and colorful tail of peacocks, deployed during courtship. When choosing a partner for reproduction, animals are facing an important dilemma. On the one hand, some of the characteristics of their potential mate may truly indicate the quality of their genes – they may somehow correlate with how good of an offspring can be expected from mating with them. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Evolution, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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