Femme accoudée à la table

Understanding beauty.

Can the perception that people have of works of art be explained by neuroscience? A perspective piece published in PLoS Biology last month by Bevil R. Conway and Alexander Rehding tackles this interesting question1. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Evolution, In Society, Neuroeducation, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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The Pregnant Homunculus

One of the hazards associated with being a neuroscientist is that propecia you see the world through neural-colored glasses: everything relates back to brain functioning in some way or another. I suppose this can probably be said about clomid online any number of professions, and I may be biased, but I think neuro-geeks (myself included) have a particularly interesting view of the world. Let me give you an example. Continue reading

Posted in by Leanne Boucher, Neuroanatomy, Pregnancy and Parenting, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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Take a Break–How Your Brain Decides When to “Take Five”

If you’ve ever been backpacking you know the problem neuroscientist Mathias Pessiglione and his colleagues are interested in solving–when to take a break.  This subtle question may seem trivial at first, until you realize that this decision-making process affects every one of us, every day, in everything we do, and yet we don’t know how we do it.  Whether you are an athlete or a desk jockey, success in your endeavor hinges on allocating your effort and rest periods optimally.  In the extreme, this decision can be perilous.

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Posted in Brain Basics, by Douglas Fields, Educators, Mood, Neural Network Function, Neuroeconomics, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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Just Itching to Know

What is an itch?  That insistent tickle demanding that you cease whatever you are doing and claw with your fingernails at a particular spot on your skin.  It can come from anywhere—the top of your head to the soles of your feet–inside your ear to your eyeballs.  NOTHING will satisfy an itch except scratching it.  Continue reading

Posted in by Douglas Fields, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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Yes, I’ll have some dessert

It’s a special occasion. You get dressed up and go to a fancy restaurant.

The lights are dim, there are candles on the tables, bold sculptures and beautiful artwork are on the walls, and lush green plants and trees are tastefully placed around the intimate restaurant.
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Posted in by Leanne Boucher, Diet and Exercise, Senses and Perception
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Prefrontal brain areas track subjective confidence.

People act and decide with varying confidence levels.

As they explore novel environments, people try options before fully committing to them; testing if that wooden bridge is solid enough, inspecting the tires of a car or trying a limited version of a product before buying it. Tracking and improving the confidence that we have on what surrounds us allows us to explore and exploit features of the environment successfully. Confidence is likely a major determinant of the economical decisions that we make, but the brain mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Awareness and Attention, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Learning and Memory, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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