What’s in Your Nightmares? The Top 5 Recurring Dreams of Adults and Kids

We spend a third of our life in a completely altered state of consciousness, indeed madness.  Dreaming is a descent into what would otherwise be a severe form of psychosis, and often these hallucinations are terrifying.  Dreams that reoccur are especially disturbing, and nearly everyone has experienced them.  A new study reveals the most common content of recurring dreams and finds very different hallucinations in the dreaming minds of adults and children.

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Posted in by Douglas Fields, Childhood, Pregnancy and Parenting, Sleep, Stress and Anxiety
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Brian Williams ‘False Memory’ – a Neuroscience Perspective

NBC News anchor Brian Williams apologized for his erroneous account of being aboard a helicopter forced to make an emergency landing after being hit by enemy fire while reporting on the Iraq war in 2003.  Williams blames the fallibility of human recall for the error.  How can the neuroscience of memory (and false memory) provide insight?

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Posted in by Douglas Fields, Learning and Memory, Neural Network Function, Neuroeducation, Press, Sleep
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Big Brain Stories of 2014

As we turn the page on 2014, here’s a list of some of the year’s highlights in neuroscience – along with a heavy dose of speculation about what they might mean for the future of the brain.

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Posted in About Neuroscience, Aging, Animal Research, Brain Basics, Brain Development, by Dwayne Godwin, Childhood, Degenerative Disorders, Diet and Exercise, Diseases & Disorders, Epilepsy, Movement Disorders, Neuroeconomics, Policymakers, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Sleep, Stress and Anxiety, Technologies
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How is the brain like a guitar? Hint: It is all about rhythm

Typically we are introduced to the nervous system by analogy to an electrical circuit, like a door bell or a telephone line carrying a signal rapidly over long distances to activate a specific process.  Never mind that electrical impulses are not transmitted through nerve axons anything like electrons flowing through a copper wire, this electronic circuit analogy is useful up to a point.    If you want to understand how the brain works at a more complex level, you are going to need a new analogy, and if you play an acoustic guitar you’ll find it under your fingertips.

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Posted in About Neuroscience, by Douglas Fields, Cell Communication, Educators, Epilepsy, Learning and Memory, Neural Network Function, Psychiatric Disorders, Senses and Perception, Sleep, Technologies, Uncategorized
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Seven Big Brain Stories of 2013

What were the biggest neuroscience stories of 2013? It may be years before we gain the perspective to know for sure. But here’s a list of top contenders, and one of dubious value.

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Posted in About Neuroscience, Aging, Brain Basics, by Dwayne Godwin, Childhood Disorders, Degenerative Disorders, Educators, Injury, Policymakers, Press, Sleep, Stress and Anxiety, Technologies
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