Ganglionic Eminence, Mice

NEURO.tv Episode 1

This week we are trying something new. Can we make a video conference about brain research and will people be interested in it? Tell us what you think and how we could improve it! You can view our first discussion on YouTube, it was very interesting. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Across the Lifespan, Aging, Animal Research, Authors, Brain Basics, Brain Development, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, by Leanne Boucher, by Steven Miller, Childhood, Diseases & Disorders, Epilepsy, Genetics, In Society, Learning and Memory, Neuroeducation, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
Posted by Jean-François Gariépy        1 Comment
Growth Cone

How the axons of neurons find their way.

Neurons in our brains have extended branches that allow them to send and receive signals to and from other neurons. However, every neuron starts as a rather round cell with no branches. To establish connections and become functional, cells must first grow branches, called dendrites or axons. These branches then need to reach their target and establish connections. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Brain Basics, Brain Development, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Neuroanatomy
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Chemical Warfare’s Attack on the Brain

As a new blogger with the BrainFacts.org team, I would like to introduce myself and my unique perspective in the field of neuroscience. My name is Steven Miller, and I am a civilian Ph.D. candidate in the neuroscience program at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. My research may not be what you expect when you hear ‘neuroscience’. I work on developing treatments against the chemical weapons known as nerve agents. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, by Steven Miller, Epilepsy
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Tools For Thinking

Intuition pumps by Daniel Dennett

Thinking is the weirdest thing. No one really understands how it works and neuroscience has barely begun to address how the brain creates thoughts. Perhaps one of the greatest difficulties in understanding thinking is that it is a little bit like art or cooking; there are many ways of doing it, according to every one’s culture, preferences and knowledge. But like art and cooking, there are some productive, successful ways of thinking that certain people master. The masters have done it for long enough that they have accumulated good tricks – particular ways of dipping the brush in the paint, of pressing the pedal on the piano, secret ingredients. Daniel Dennett is one of those masters and in his most recent book, Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking, he has cataloged some of his and others’ best tools for thinking developed and learned through decades of reflection on computer science, biology and psychology. Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, Evolution, In Society
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Changing Your Mind: Scientists Disrupt Specific Memories in People

This may seem like old news. Thanks to Will Smith’s “neuralizer” blasting away horrific memories of alien attacks in the 1997 movie “Men in Black,” and the quest to bury the heartbreak of a broken romance in the 2004 flick “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” the concept of erasing memory has become commonplace. Continue reading

Posted in by Douglas Fields, Learning and Memory, Neuroeducation, Neuroethics, Neurolaw, Uncategorized
Posted by Douglas Fields        2 Comments

How can we enhance working memory?

Even a seemingly simple behavior–like trying to remember if the name of the person you just met is “Elizabeth” or “Patricia”–can tax our memories. These short-term memory drains are part of what we neuroscientists call “working memory”.
When you think about it, it’s quite a remarkable neural feat that we can do this at all! Somehow our brains are able to take in information (like the sound waves that hit our ears in just the right way to make us perceive the sound that is the name “Patricia”), hold that information in some neural pattern/buffer/code, and then retrieve that information at will (if we’re lucky).
Continue reading

Posted in About Neuroscience, by Bradley Voytek, Learning and Memory, Neuroethics, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
Posted by Bradley Voytek        1 Comment