Marijuana Use Causes 7-Fold Increased Risk of Violent Behavior

Marijuana use and violence

New research reported in the journal Psychological Medicine, concludes that continued use of cannabis causes violent behavior as a direct result of changes in brain function that are caused by smoking marijuana over many years. Continue reading

Posted in Addiction, Brain Development, by Douglas Fields, Chemicals, Educators, In Society, Neural Network Function, Policymakers, Psychiatric Disorders, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Uncategorized
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“You Don’t Have Time to Think.” Heroic Veteran Capt. Florent Groberg’s Selfless Action

 

Today it was announced that Army Capt. Florent Groberg will receive the Medal of Honor for instantly tackling a suicide bomber in a split-second reaction of self-sacrifice to save the lives of his comrades.  “You don’t have time to think.  You react,” he explains.  But how is that possible?

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Posted in Awareness and Attention, by Douglas Fields, In Society, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Senses and Perception, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving, Stress and Anxiety, Uncategorized
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NEURO.tv 16 – Memories, false memories and consciousness

Felipe de Brigard is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Arts & Sciences at Duke University. His research, at the intersection of philosophy, psychology and neuroscience, explores the neural mechanisms of false memories and consciousness. He joined us to discuss the nature of memory and the hard problem of consciousness. Continue reading

Posted in Across the Lifespan, Aging, Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, by John Kubie, by Leanne Boucher, Diseases & Disorders, Learning and Memory, Neural Network Function, Psychiatric Disorders, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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NEURO.tv 15 – The Evolution and Function of Mind-wandering and Metacognition

In this episode, Micah Allen, postdoctoral researcher at the University College London, discusses the evolution and function of cognition and metacognition. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Awareness and Attention, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, by John Kubie, by Leanne Boucher, Language, Learning and Memory, Neuroanatomy, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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NEURO.tv Episode 11 – Moral decision-making and the brain, with Joshua Greene.

What experiments do psychologists use to identify the brain areas involved in moral decision-making? Do moral truths exist? We discuss with Joshua D. Greene, Professor of Psychology at Harvard University and author of Moral Tribes. Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Brain Basics, by Jean-Francois Gariepy, by John Kubie, by Leanne Boucher, Diseases & Disorders, Evolution, In Society, Language, Neural Network Function, Neuroeconomics, Psychiatric Disorders, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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Neural Circuits of Fair Play Discovered in the Human Brain

“Listen to your conscience,” my mother would say.But where does that mysterious urge to do what is right come from? Scientists have now pinpointed the brain circuitry that compels us to behave according to social norms; moreover, researchers can boost a person’s fairness by exciting this brain region, and promote cheating by inhibiting this bit of brain tissue.

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Posted in by Douglas Fields, Childhood Disorders, Educators, Neural Network Function, Neuroanatomy, Neuroeducation, Neuroethics, Policymakers, Uncategorized
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How can we enhance working memory?

Even a seemingly simple behavior–like trying to remember if the name of the person you just met is “Elizabeth” or “Patricia”–can tax our memories. These short-term memory drains are part of what we neuroscientists call “working memory”.
When you think about it, it’s quite a remarkable neural feat that we can do this at all! Somehow our brains are able to take in information (like the sound waves that hit our ears in just the right way to make us perceive the sound that is the name “Patricia”), hold that information in some neural pattern/buffer/code, and then retrieve that information at will (if we’re lucky).
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Posted in About Neuroscience, by Bradley Voytek, Learning and Memory, Neuroethics, Sensing, Thinking & Behaving
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